art of resistance, Turkey

Playlist: Aynur Doğan.

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Aynur (Doğan) is a Kurdish singer from Turkey. She was born in Çemişgezek, a small mountain town in Dersim Province and fled to İstanbul in the 90’s.

Her album Keçe Kurdan (released in 2004) was banned by the provincial court in Diyarbakır on the grounds that the lyrics contained propaganda for an illegal organization (the court ruling said the album “incites women to take to the hills and promotes division”). The ban was later lifted.

You can listen to the beautiful song Dar Hejiroke (from the above mentioned album), here.

Previous Playlist:

Hello Pshychaleppo

Grup Bunalim

I Was Born For Poetry (Adonis)

The Partisan

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art of resistance, Syria

Playlist: Hello Pshychaleppo.

screen-shot-2015-07-13-at-19-29-31/From the video Shahba/

Today is Middle East Revised’s third birthday. Here’s a nice tune to go with it. It is not necessarily celebratory, but it suits the last three years of writing and posting here. I am happy to have these years.

Hello Pshychaleppo is a project by Samer Saem Eldahr, and it’s all about fusing Arab heritage music and electronic sounds.

For the video Shahba, Eldahr asked friends to send him any footage that they had of Aleppo. “I wanted to do a mixture of footage and the animation that I create myself. It’s like a composition of our collective memory”, he says in an interview .

Doing this project wasn’t easy. “Whilst working on this project I also had to do a lot of research about Aleppo, particularly the visuals that Aleppians relate to.

For example, there is a yellow man who is very well known in Aleppo simply for the fact that he wears only yellow. He never takes it off. For every Aleppian or for every person who has been to Aleppo they relate to this person, this image. It’s in our visual memory. So things like this bring a lot of memories and it’s bitter-sweet”, Eldahr explains.

Listen & watch the video here.

Previous Playlist:

Grup Bunalim

I Was Born For Poetry (Adonis)

The Partisan

Rojava Women

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art of resistance, Turkey

Playlist: Grup Bunalim.

anatali/illustration: Emre Önol/

Anatolian Rock Revival Project is a project dedicated to bringing the non-mainstream pieces from the Turkish rock history (60s&70s) into light with unique art works.

The following is a song from the 1970, by the band Grup Bunalim, called Taş Var Köpek Yok. Enjoy the song and be sure to check out the rest of the songs included in the Anatolian Rock Revival Project.

You can listen to the song here.

Previous Playlist:

I Was Born For Poetry (Adonis)

The Partisan

Rojava Women

The Melody of our Alienation (Yemen)

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art of resistance, Syria

Playlist: Rojava Women.

rojava

Female pressure is an international network of female artists in the fields of electronic music and digital arts founded by ElectricIndigo – from musicians, composers and DJs to visual artists, cultural workers and researchers.

Their Rojava Women compilation was out in March this year. The album is described as “tracks of understanding and solidarity. Sounds in support of a continuous, relentless opposition to regional fascism and, at the same time to universal fascism, religious or secular.

Opposition carried through body and soul on behalf of us all. Opposition that can make life, as a future of freedom and equality, available to all. Opposition that we must keep alive before we can celebrate.”

This compilation is a donation campaign – the donations go directly to the women of Rojava to build a women’s village on location called The Village Project.

You can find out more about the album and listen to the songs here.

Previous Playlist:

The Melody of our Alienation (Yemen)

Ruba Shamshoum

Jerusalem in my heart

Maghawir by Mashrou’ Leila

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art of resistance, Yemen

Playlist: The Melody Of Our Alienation (Yemen).

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                                                                                     /photo  © Jonathon Collins/

A horrific attack in Sana’a yesterday (Saudi-led warplanes struck a funeral, leaving more than 200 people killed, and more than 500 injured) took me back to Yemen and its tragedies, most of which are unravelling far from the media flashlights.

At the same time, there are reports about intensive care wards in Yemen’s hospitals being filled with emaciated children hooked up to monitors and drips – victims of food shortages that could get even worse due to a reorganisation of the central bank that is worrying importers.

With food ships finding it hard to get into Yemen’s ports due to a virtual blockade, over half the country’s 28 million people already do not have enough to eat, according to the United Nations.

It’s like Safa Al Ahmad describes it in an interview with Status Hour“Fighters are the ones who get salaries these days in Yemen, nobody else does. It just goes to show you how fragile the situation has become. I would argue that there’s no longer a Yemen, North and South are completely separate from each other”.

The playlist today is a small way of reaching out to Sana’a, to Yemen. The Melody of Our Alienation is a reminder that no matter how strange the city of Sana’a (and Yemen in general) feels now, its people are not strangers in their own city. It is their city. It is where they belong. It is where they will make a difference as agents of peace.

It’s a way of searching for something soft, something gentle, something that makes sense amidst this chaos:

“Sana’a.. Even if she slept on its sorrows for some time. Even if she caved in and the numbness took too long. Her morning shall revolt in the face of darkness. And certainly… The rain will one day wash away her drought.”

Previous Playlist:

Ruba Shamshoum

Jerusalem in my heart

Maghawir by Mashrou’ Leila

Selda Bağcan

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art of resistance, Palestine

Playlist: Ruba Shamshoum.

ruba-shamshoum-678x500/from the video Fuqaati/

Ruba Shamshoum is an incredibly talented Palestinan musician, currently living in Dublin. She was born and raised in Nazareth, and went to Ireland to study jazz performance. Shamshoum is influenced by jazz, rock, hip hop and naturally by Middle Eastern music.

She started composing and writing her own material in 2011, including the song Ya Leil La Trouh for Annmarie Jacir’s film When I Saw You (it was included in my list of must-see Palestinian movies two years ago), and the sweet sweet tune Fuqaati (My Bubble).

You can listen to Fuqaati here (and see its lovely animated video) – it’s a true delight!

Previous Playlist:

Jerusalem in my heart

Maghawir by Mashrou’ Leila

Selda Bağcan

Saul Williams

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