art of resistance, Iran, travel

Kandovan, Iran: Living In A Cave.

Kandovan (Iran) is one of the handful villages in the world that was carved into rocks. The story of Kandovan is a story of the 21st century cavemen. Brownbook’s Sophie Chamas describes the trip to Kandovan with the photographer Saber Alinejad:

” ‘I travel to Kandovan a lot. I usually drive, taking the mountainous Kargar Boulevard past the garden city of Osku towards a path that’s full of twists and turns. It takes me through villages full of pink roses before leading me to Kandovan, an incredible village that highlights the history of this land.’ 

Like many residents of Tabriz, the capital of northwestern Iran’s East Azerbaijan province, photographer Saber Alinejad has been making regular excursions 60 kilometres south to the neighbouring village of Kandovan since he was a child. Believed to be more than 700 years old, the sparsely populated, ancient town of around 600 residents welcomes around 300,000 visitors from Tabriz, greater Iran and far beyond each year, all eager to admire its unusual landscape and meet the troglodytes, or cave dwellers, who call it home.”

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Chamas continues saying:

Windows, electricity cables, clotheslines, doors and chimneys become increasingly discernible with every passing kilometre, marking these aged caves not as archaic dwellings, but contemporary homes. ‘Visiting this landscape for the first time as a child was very strange,’ recalls Alinejad. ‘I didn’t know what to make of these people carving “hives” into volcanic rock.’

As an ensemble, these caves are often compared to an enormous termite colony, explaining why their residents call them ‘karan’, meaning ‘beehives’ in the local Turkic dialect.”

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“‘Kandovan is one of a handful of villages in the world that was carved into rocks,’ says Alinejad, ‘and it’s only here that people continue to inhabit their caves. They have the option of leaving for bigger cities to study and find better work, but many like living here. For them, it’s like being in a sturdy castle.’ “

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For more about this unique village and its residents, read the full article on Brownbook.

I am finding this story lovely lovely (double lovely is intentional) and can’t help myself but to think about Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. Connecting it with the Kandovan caves story, we could say that the residents of Kandovan might never find the freedom of the philosopher, but I am sure there is beauty to their caves and a freedom of its own. In this case, it just might be the opposite of Plato’s allegory  – free from many torments of the global plague of capitalism , it is they, inside the caves – who can see the life limpidly.

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//all images © Saber Alinejad/ Brownbook//

For more great photos of Kandovan, you can also visit Heritage Institute.

 

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